tribecacsa

Tribeca CSA Newsletter — Week 17

In Weekly Newsletter on October 9, 2009 at 1:50 PM

News

The Harvest Dinner is a week from Sunday! The potluck picnic is scheduled for Sunday, October 18th, 4-6pm, at the park! Potluck sign-ups and RSVP either at distribution or via email to lizzvw@mac.com

Next Week’s Work Shift:

The people doing workshifts on October 13th are:

2 – 4:30pm: Gayathri V. & Laura E.
4 – 6:30pm: Jessica W. & Lucy Y.

As always, you can check the work shift schedule anytime by looking at the Work Shift Calendar!

Vegetable Highlight: Pumpkin

The pumpkin was one of the many foods used by the Native American Indians in the new world and was a welcome discovery by the Pilgrims. The new Americans heartily embraced the sweet, multi-purpose fruit which became a traditional Thanksgiving food.

Pumpkins are popular at Halloween when they are carved into Jack-o’-lanterns. The practice was brought to the United States by Irish immigrants who originally carved turnips into Jack-o’-lanterns. In America, pumpkins were more plentiful and cheaper than turnips, and so came about the switch from turnips to pumpkins.

For cooking, use small and sweet pumpkins, with dark orange-colored flesh. They’re perfect for pies, soups, muffins and breads. A medium-sized (4-pound) sugar pumpkin should yield around 1½ cups of mashed pumpkin. This puree can be used in all your recipes calling for canned pumpkin.

HOW TO MAKE FRESH PUMPKIN PUREE USED FOR BAKING:

Baking Method

Cut the pumpkin in half and discard the stem section and stringy pulp. Save the seeds to dry and roast.

In a shallow baking dish, place the two halves face down and cover with foil. Bake in a preheated 375 degrees F (190 degrees C) oven for about 1½ hours for a medium-sized sugar pumpkin, or until tender. Once the baked pumpkin has cooled, scoop out the flesh and puree or mash it. For silky smooth custards or soups, press the pumpkin puree through a sieve.

Boiling Method

Cut the pumpkin in half, discarding the stringy insides. Peel the pumpkin and cut it into chunks. Place in a saucepan and cover with water. Bring to a boil and cook until the pumpkin chunks are tender. Let the chunks cool, and then puree the flesh in a food processor or mash it with a potato masher or food mill.

Recipes

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