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Archive for July, 2011|Monthly archive page

Week 7, Group A

In 2011 Shares on July 26, 2011 at 9:25 PM

Vegetables: 

5 Corn

1 Bunch Beets

2lbs Summer Squash

2 Round Zucchini

1 Bunch Red Leaf Lettuce

1 Bunch Chives

1 Bunch Basil

1 Bunch Cilantro

1 Bunch Pak Choi

Fruit:

2 1/2 pint Raspberries

6 Peaches

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Week 6, Group B

In 2011 Shares on July 19, 2011 at 9:28 PM

Photo by ajinthekitchen

Vegetables:

1 Bunch Onions

1 Bunch Carrots

1 Bunch Turnips

1lb Yellow Summer Squash

1 Bunch Romaine Lettuce

1 Bunch Purslane

1 Bunch Mint

1 Bunch Parsley

Fruit:

2 1/2 pint Raspberries

1 1/2 pint Blackberries

Purslane is rich with Omega-3!

In Recipes on July 12, 2011 at 7:51 AM

purslane

Verdolaga is the Spanish name for a common garden weed known as purslane or pigweed in English. It is widely eaten in the Middle East both in salads and cooked like spinach. It has a reputation for curative powers going back to the ancient Greeks. It’s extremely good for you, in fact, purslane has more Omega-3 fatty acids than any other vegetable plant.

For more info on storage, perparation and recipes, download Just Food’s Purslane Tip Sheet.

More Purslane Recipes:
Purslane and Parsley Salad
Purslane Cucumber Salad
Purslane Green Bean Marinade
Purslane Gazpacho
Purslane Pasta w/Cherry Tomatoes
Purslane Salsa
Purslane Spanish Rice
Grilled Zucchini Salad with Purslane and Tomato

Week 4 Group B distribution

In 2011 Shares on July 11, 2011 at 7:54 AM

Week 4: Squash Blossoms Arrive!

In Recipes on July 5, 2011 at 2:39 PM

Squash Blossoms

squashblossomsSquash blossoms (also sometimes called “zucchini flowers”) are cheap and plentiful in Latin America, where they are called flores de calabaza, but around here they’re mostly a farmers’ market delicacy.  Nutritionally, the flowers are similar to lettuce; you’d have to eat a lot to get much out of them. Aesthetically, however, they can bring a dish to life with a splash of color and texture. Depending on who you ask, they taste like popcorn or something slightly sweet and nutty; or, more poetically, like pure summer and squash perfume.  There are many ways to cook and enjoy these beauties—fried, baked, souped-up or stuffed.

Now, when it comes to squash blossoms, there is one very important but simple question: is it a boy or a girl?

Male blossoms grow from the branches of the squash; female blossoms bear fruit. Male blossoms will be downy, even hairy to the touch; female blossoms will have a soft, fleshy ovary center behind the blossom—which develops into the fruit; the male won’t.

Why is this important?  Well, it may be a matter of taste. Some say the male blossom is preferable because the lump of squash ovary is not there. Easier to prepare and eat.  Others say the female blossom is not only plump but succulent. This fruitier blossom is delectable.  One thing is for certain, there are more male flowers than female flowers on each plant, and the male flowers keep longer. Fruitier female squash blossoms spoil quickly and should be prepared and served on the same day they are picked. Male blossoms will keep a few days.  Male blossoms appear first. The female flower will contain a 4-part pistil in the center.

Store: Squash blossoms are very perishable. Arrange them on paper towel lined tray, refrigerate and use within one day.  Male blossoms will keep for 1 week at 50ºF (10°C) and 2 to 4 days at 40ºF (4°C). Chilling injury will occur if held for several days at temperatures below 50ºF (10°C).  You can also freeze, can, pickle, or dry squash blossoms. If cooked, blossoms will store in the freezer for 6 to 8 months.

Prepare: Open and inspect squash blossoms for insects before using them. Pull off and discard the green calyxes surrounding the bottom of the blossom. Clean blossoms by gently swishing them in a bowl of cold water. Shake them dry. Trim or snip out the anthers or style.

Serve: Use squash blossoms as a garnish raw on crêpes, green salads, fruit salads, soups, and quesadillas.

Recipe: Squash Blossom Quesadilla

Delicate flores de calabaza (squash blossoms) are delicious in quesadillas, soups, and tacos or simply battered and fried on their own.

  • 2  8″ flour tortillas
  • 1 cup grated queso oaxaca, a creamy Mexican string cheese
  • 5 fresh squash blossoms
  • 1 tbsp. canola oil
  • Salsa

1. Top one flour tortilla with 1/2 cup grated cheese. Trim squash blossoms and remove and discard their stamens. Arrange squash blossoms over the cheese, overlapping them slightly. Top with the remaining 1/2 cup cheese and tortilla.

2. Heat canola oil in a medium skillet over medium-high heat. Cook quesadilla, flipping once, until cheese is melted and quesadilla is golden brown on both sides, 4–5 minutes in all. Transfer to a plate, cut into quarters, and serve immediately, with salsa, if you like.

Other recipes: